Stankard

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This information, along with many additional maps showing the Stankard name distribution in Ireland and England, is available at [| the Stankard name page on RootsWeb]. Is has been compiled and maintained by James Moore Stankard over many years, and continued by his son [David Stankard].

There are records of Stankards, and similar phonetic spellings, going back to the 1500's in England, and a number of families bearing the name were scattered across the East of County Galway, and in County Leitrim Ireland in the early 1800's. Some of this Galway group moved to the Liverpool, England area in the early 1800's, and then during the Famine many Stankards joined the swelling stream of Irish coming to America.

In the mid 1830's there were Stankards in the parishes of Ballinasloe, Clontuskert, Killallaghtan, Kiltullagh, Loughrea, and Portumna, in the eastern part of County Galway. The adjoining counties of Clare, Mayo, Offaly, Roscommon, and Tipperary have not yet revealed any Stankards, but some were found in County Leitrim, north and a little east on the other side of County Roscommon. To make it easier to vizualize, I have assembled a series of maps showing Stankards recorded in church and census records both before and after Griffith's Valuation, as well as the actual records found in Griffith's Valuation of 1855 for Counties Galway and Leitrim, which are all located at [| the Stankard name page on RootsWeb].

All of the Stankards who came to the U.S. seem to have sprung from at least five, perhaps six, groups of immigrants, most of whom originated in the heart of East County Galway, Ireland. I have not been able to establish a relationship between any of these groups but continue to trace back in Ireland seeking that relationship.

The earliest group appears to be those who settled in Stamford, Connecticut in the very early 1800's after coming from County Galway or County Mayo.

Next are the five brothers who settled in Ohio after arriving in this country from County Galway beginning in 1847. My direct ancestor Edward's obituary says that he was born in Ballinasloe, County Galway, about 40 miles east of the city of Galway. We have found his father Michael in Clontuskert, a parish which borders that of Ballinasloe, listed in the Tithe Applotment Books of 1824 as renting a plot of land in the Townland of Sheepwalk, in the south of the parish.

The third group was quite large and settled in Boston in the 1850's after coming from the area of Athenry, about 15 miles east of the city of Galway. We have found records of several of this group living in Kiltullagh parish.

Also in the 1850's a William Stankard arrived in Indiana from Ireland, (we're not yet sure where) and found work digging the Wabash Canal. His descendants continue to live in the north central Indiana area.

The fifth group are descendants of Marie Stankard, a widow who was married to a Patrick Stankard and who had four children in Portumna, County Galway, and first settled in western Massachusetts in 1876 then later moved to Long Island, New York.

There are now Stankards all across the United States. One of the Boston group moved to Long Island around 1900. At about the same time some of the Connecticut group moved to North Bergen, New Jersey. Around the 1950's another of the Boston group moved to the Camden, New Jersey area and about that same time one of the Long Island group also moved to New Jersey. Two different parts of the Ohio group, 100 years apart, moved to Alabama. So you can see that there is quite a sizable group of Stankards scattered through the area from northern New Jersey, New York City, Long Island and Connecticut, on to Boston and some on Cape Cod. Many are aware of others bearing their name and feel a vague but undefined sense of relationship. Family charts, some more complete than others, have been made for all of these different groups.

In England, several brothers from the group in Kiltullagh moved to Oldham, near Manchester, and there are many still living in that area, as well as more across the entire country.

And of course, there are still many Stankards in east Galway!

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