Difference between revisions of "Jacques"

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'''JACQUES, JAQUES, JAYKES'''
 
'''JACQUES, JAQUES, JAYKES'''
  
Jacques is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The name Jacques came from the personal name "Jacques," which is a form of the Latin name "Jacobus." While the anglicized forms of the name were common during the centuries immediately following the conquest, it is thought that the forms "Jaquest," "Jaquiss," and "Jaquez" arose in England in later years, as the French language became increasingly associated with high culture and status.
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Jacques is one of the many names that the [[Normans]] brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The name Jacques came from the personal name "Jacques," which is a form of the Latin name "Jacobus." While the anglicized forms of the name were common during the centuries immediately following the conquest, it is thought that the forms "Jaquest," "Jaquiss," and "Jaquez" arose in [[England]] in later years, as the French language became increasingly associated with high culture and status.
  
First found in Yorkshire where they were seated as Lords of the Manor of Nether Silton in the North Riding of Yorkshire. At the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086, Nether Silton was recorded as a village with a Hall and the tenant-in-chief was the Count of Mortain. The Domesday Book was a census initiated by Duke William of Normandy taken after his conquest of England at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
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First found in Yorkshire where they were seated as Lords of the Manor of Nether Silton in the North Riding of Yorkshire. At the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086, Nether Silton was recorded as a village with a Hall and the tenant-in-chief was the Count of Mortain. The [[Domesday Book]] was a census initiated by Duke William of Normandy taken after his conquest of England at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
  
 
== People with the surname include ==
 
== People with the surname include ==
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{{surname}}
 
{{surname}}
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{{english}}
 
{{french}}
 
{{french}}

Revision as of 13:35, 17 August 2007

JACQUES, JAQUES, JAYKES

Jacques is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The name Jacques came from the personal name "Jacques," which is a form of the Latin name "Jacobus." While the anglicized forms of the name were common during the centuries immediately following the conquest, it is thought that the forms "Jaquest," "Jaquiss," and "Jaquez" arose in England in later years, as the French language became increasingly associated with high culture and status.

First found in Yorkshire where they were seated as Lords of the Manor of Nether Silton in the North Riding of Yorkshire. At the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086, Nether Silton was recorded as a village with a Hall and the tenant-in-chief was the Count of Mortain. The Domesday Book was a census initiated by Duke William of Normandy taken after his conquest of England at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

People with the surname include

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