Israel

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Revision as of 03:10, 22 September 2007 by Barak4u (talk | contribs) (Interest in genealogy)
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This page is about the country of Israel specifically, and the Jewish people in general.

Language

English is fairly widespread in Israel, especially among the younger generation, but a large part of the nation only speaks Hebrew. Hebrew is written right-to-left, and uses a special alphabet.

Internet availability

High-speed Internet is very common in Israel, and it is frequently used. Israeli sites tend to be slightly behind on the recent technologies (for example, Facebook still didn't quite catch, but blogging is very popular). Israeli sites are all in Hebrew.

Other things to consider

Certain Jewish records are kept in the Hebrew calendar, which uses letters instead of numbers. The "modern" form is a fixed arithmetic lunisolar calendar. Because of the roughly 11 day difference between twelve lunar months and one solar year, the calendar repeats in a Metonic 19-year cycle of 235 lunar months, with an extra lunar month added once every two or three years, for a total of 7 times per 19 years. As the Hebrew calendar was developed in the region east of the Mediterranean Sea, references to seasons reflect the times and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.

In Jewish culture, it is customary to commemorate the death of a relative (this is something to add to the calendar on Geni).

Valued information about people: Rabbi's: Books that were written by them, cities where they presided IDF Soldiers KIA or MIA: Operation this happened Holocaust survivors: what camps they went through.

Jewish Names / Surnames

Most Jewish names are using D-M soundex searches. They are form Poland, Russia, Ukraine and many other eastern European countries. This usually makes searching for relatives fairly difficult. When searching for your family ancestors, you would like to consider searching for 5,6 and even more variations of your surname. Option to add multiple names will have special value here - Hebrew (in use in Israel), English (in use by non-Israeli relatives) and Russian (to preserve the original one) for the same person.

First names are mostly transliterated, which makes for a lot of multiple spellings in latin alphabet (consider Isaac, Yitschak, Yitshak, Aizek and more for the same name יצחק). This means when you implement tree merging with Hebrew names you should check for the Hebrew spelling and have different fields for English and Hebrew names.

Interest in genealogy

Genealogy has always been important to the Jewish people, and some families have kept good records of their lineage. The records are mostly of paternal lineage or else of connections to important scholars. Also some have lost their ספרי יוחסין (Sifrei Yuchasin - Books of lineage) over the generations but have kept passing the important names in oral form to the coming generations, causing for a lot of cases where you get to a name of whom it is known he descended from this and this Rabbi of whom it is known he descended from King David. And more.

Unlike most of the people around the world whom can trace their family records easily through existing local records, the Jewish-Israeli society mostly relay on their own family's memory when it comes to each family personal roots. Most of the Jewish-Israelis came from Europe from small Jewish communities (Shtetls) whom lived there their modest simple lives usually separately from the European society, that's why after the holocaust it became hard to find any records of past ancestors/families as most of them had been destroyed. Many of the holocaust survivors whom came to Israel had such a trauma from the war that they decided not to talk about the past with their descendants... and that's why in a lot of cases the holocaust survivors are taking their "family knowledge" with them to the grave.

In the last 2-3 decades the Jewish Israeli society acknowledged that problem and in an attempt to get as much of the family knowledge of the Jewish-Israeli citizens written down before it vanishes with the elderly people to the grave, it was decided in the education system that the all the 12 year old students would be given a school project when they reach the 7th grade for which they would be graded on to write down their family history and interview their living ancestors. Most of those school projects are written down with the help of the parents and continue to serve as the main source of family knowledge for many years later. when I was 12 years old I remember doUnlike most of the people around the world whom can trace their family records easily through existing local records, the Jewish-Israeli society mostly relay on their own family's memory when it comes to each family personal roots. Most of the Jewish-Israelis came from Europe from small Jewish communites whom lived there their modest simple lives usually seperatly from the european society, thats why after the holocaust it became hard to find any records of past ancestors/families as most of them had been destroyed. Many of the holocaust survivors whom came to Israel had such a truama from the war that they decided not to talk about the past with their decendents... and thats why in a lot of cases the holocaust survivors are taking their "family knowledge" with them to the grave.

In the last 2-3 decades the Jewish Israeli society aknoledged that problem and in an attempt to get as much of the family knowledge of the Jewish-Israeli citezens written down before it vanishes with the elderly people to the grave, it was decided in the education system that the all the 12 year old students would be given a school project when they reach the 7th grade for which they would be graded on to write down their family history and interview their living ancestors. Most of those school projects are written down with the help of the parents and continue to serve as the main source of family knowledge for many years later.

The Holocaust has left many Jewish families separated from their relatives and their past. Attempts are often made to reconnect with lost relatives.

Date Format

Israel like many other Middle Eastern countries, only uses 1 date format.

  • Day, Month, Year (DD/MM/YY or YYYY)
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